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Baltimore, Maryland interior designer Brad Weesner shares insights on luxury residential design and fine commercial interiors. Read blog.

Advisory on Hiring an Interior Designer

I am a columnist for Housely, an information site dedicated so home design, interior decorating inspiration, architecture, and real estate news.

In my latest article, I discuss things to consider when hiring an interior designer. I share how to find interior designers to consider and important speaking points to bring up to an interior designer, such as budget. 

To read the article titled, How to Hire an Interior Designer, click here

Questions to Ask Before Hiring an Interior Designer

Hiring an interior designer is not easy – it requires research and time. To help you alleviate the process, here are some questions to ask interior designers and advice to make the process of hiring a designer easier for you.

  1. What do you describe as a good working relationship with a client?
  2. What timeframe would you suggest for the scope of project that we talked about?
  3. How would you describe your typical process - the approach to your work?
  4. How do you charge - how do your fees work? (It’s too early to ask what your fee would be, as you need to clarify lots of things around the scope of the work together first!)
  5. Do you prefer to keep within a general style, or do you prefer to work among various styles and/or periods?
  6. How much experience do you have in bathrooms, window treatments, building homes, placing pools, custom designing furniture, etc.
  7. What have been a couple of your most successful projects? And why?
  8. Tell me about one of your more unsuccessful projects, what happened and how did you resolve things?
  9. Would you describe yourself more as an interior decorator or as an interior designer? (We shouldn’t put a lot of stock in the actual answer here, but it’s good to hear how the designer/decorator answers this question, and how they position themselves.)
  10. If I’m getting concerned about how things are progressing, how would you prefer I bring that up?
  11. How long have you been in business?
  12. Why do you do this profession? What makes you do this job every day? (This is a very disarming question in the middle of a conversation, and the designer should not only be able to handle this with ease, but describe with some degree of passion about why they do this very tough job.)

Remember, hiring an interior designer deserves a good interview from both parties to get it started well. Good luck, please contactour Baltimore Interior Design Firm if you would like any advice about this process, or the next steps moving forward with your new designer.

The Difference Between an Interior Designer and an Interior Decorator

An interior decorator helps with many of the decoration details of an existing interior; area rugs, wall colors, wall coverings, help with artwork, perhaps draperies, and general furnishings. A decorator is what we first think of when we wonder about getting some help. In working with the room’s confines, we think of adding some pillows over there with that new sofa, and maybe new window treatments. An interior decorator certainly feels more approachable.

An interior designer helps in a more holistic way, and works with many other things in mind – things you may never realize; health and human safety, ergonomics, color theory, spatial planning, proxemics, lighting design, built-in features, moldings, trims and other architectural details before moving onto the wall coverings, furnishings, area rugs, art, draperies, and the decoration your room will need.

The designer might sound just like what you need, or may sound overwhelming, and yet I strongly encourage you to weigh out how you want your journey to go. A designer would likely work in the background to learn more about not just what you want, but why you want what you want. How does your family live? The effect of sunlight color in your rooms, the level of entertaining you wish to do, the size of your husband’s frame, and the length of your legs for your chair. In planning furniture placement, it is more likely that the designer has already thought of the access from the lower level in placing a floor outlet for the floating furniture you both have just found inspiring. A designer may think of a chandelier lift in the ceiling of your two-story foyer, a $500 cost while the work can be done, saving ladders and danger during cleaning and changing bulbs. Concealed wiring that turns on lights collectively can be easily done before the room is painted, and be cost prohibitive later. A designer does more, but it does not mean that a decorator does less either.

The lines can get very blurred, and things get confusing. I know of people who present themselves as interior designers, who do not know very much about the building process, such as floor joist support for the extra granite you are thinking about in the kitchen, and other details. And I know of people who refer to themselves as interior decorators who are fully and completely trained in the aspects of interior design. Unfortunately, there are no strict guidelines on the differences, unless you get into complicated discussions of certain and unpredictable accreditations.

A Custom Reception Desk

This beautiful and energetic reception desk is made of concrete and marble and is a masterpiece of complicated lines, angles and cuts. The desk "explodes" from its space and nearly bisects the round column. The layers of angles that form the transaction top give way to similar angles in the face portion, now pulling away from the round column.

This beautiful and energetic reception desk is made of concrete and marble and is a masterpiece of complicated lines, angles and cuts. The desk "explodes" from its space and nearly bisects the round column. The layers of angles that form the transaction top give way to similar angles in the face portion, now pulling away from the round column.

Brad Weesner on Million Dollar Decorating

Baltimore Interior Designer Brad Weesner was a special guest on Million Dollar Decorating, a design podcast on design hosted by James Swan.

Brad openly shares how his love for design started as a child. He expresses his influences, and discusses his new furniture designs. He also talks about how he loves to capture his client’s vision through design and expresses his love for establishing deep and meaningful relationships with his clients.

He also goes into detail about how his favorite and most challenging part of design – relationships.

Listen to the entire podcast by clicking here